Becoming a Teacher Who Writes: Getting Started


We believe that teachers who write make the best teachers of writing.

Last week, we shared the reasons behind why we feel this way and all the benefits of being a teacher-writer. This week, we share a few ways for you to start your writing habit and grow as a teacher-writer.

So, what are teacher-writers writing these days?

Reflection Journals: Spend a few minutes at the end of every school day writing about your day. What happened? What surprised you? What irritated you? What warmed your heart? What memory do you want to hold on to forever? This is a great activity for students too. (We called them Learning Journals in my classroom and my students wrote one new thing they learned every day. This became a great reflection and growth tool to look back on throughout the year.)

Blogs: Blogging is the best way to practice your professional writing AND connect with other teachers from around the world. Furthermore, blogs create an artifact that you may be able to use for teacher effectiveness documentation or professional development plans. There are two different kinds of blogs teachers write: those that reflect on their practice (lesson plans, unit ideas, etc.) and those that reflect on classroom and teaching life. (You can always mix the two if you'd like.) If you choose to blog, we highly recommend connecting with the Slice of Life community on Two Writing Teachers every Tuesday by writing and sharing a slice of life.

Personal Journaling: Make a goal to spend seven minutes every day writing about what's on your mind. Seven minutes. In doing so, you are creating a memoir of your life.

Word of the Day: Search #DWHabit (Daily Writing Habit) on Twitter and you will find a new word every day to spark your writing ideas.